It is common that most people do the trimming or pruning of their plants and trees around their property at the end of the winter season, but that is not necessarily the best time or only time to do so. There is also spring pruning and summer pruning and there really is very little reason to prune at all during the fall. If you do not know how to prune or are looking for professional help in this area to ensure that your trees are producing healthy buds and not stealing away nutrients from other plants, call for Tree Service Shreveport LA.

For starters, most plants of any species go through a dormancy time and that is usually in the winter months. Since there is no growth at this time it is usually safe to do your pruning which is most likely conducted after the last of the coldest temperatures have passed. By scaling back on the unhealthy parts, a species will be given a chance to invigorate and create new healthy life. Then there are the summer pruning jobs that help cut off diseased growth and the time to redirect growth into a particular pattern that is more visible during this later pruning season.

There are a few issues to be concerned about when pruning and it is always best to get the guidance of a Tree Service Shreveport LA for recommendations on newer plants and trees. Companies such as Earthworks Lawn & Tree can give consultations or quarterly, monthly or bi-weekly services to ensure that your growth around the home is according to healthy recommendations. There are tips to follow to get good results from your pruning efforts.

There is a general 1/3 and 1/4 rule to pruning. You should never remove more than 1/4 of the crown of a plant and the branch or offshoot length of a plant should never be more than 1/3 of the diameter of the tree. As with any cut, make sure that your tools are sharp and there is no need to treat a fresh cut unless it is for aesthetic purposes. When particulars of the branch are in question such as above or below a bud, it is best to follow the professionals so that you know how to do it for yourself next time. A good contractor’s rule is good for gardening as well, measure twice and cut once.