During your personal injury trial, a judge and/or a jury will examine all of the evidence that your Injury Attorney in Tulsa has presented in order to determine whether or not the defendant should be legally and financially responsible for the injury. A personal injury trial is your opportunity to try to argue your case. Naturally, a trial is also the defendant’s chance to defend why they should not be responsible for the accident. The defendant and his or her lawyer would be able to enter evidence supporting their side of the case as well. After the judge and/or jury decides whether or not the defendant should be found liable, they would also determine how much money the defendant should have to pay. A full-fledged personal injury trial is going to include seven stages:

  Choosing the Jury
*   Opening Statements
*   Witness Testimonies
  Cross-Examinations of Witnesses
*   The Closing Arguments
  Jury Will Be Instructed
*   Deliberation and Verdict

Unless your personal injury case is being tried before a judge and only a judge, your lawyer and the defendant’s lawyer would have to start by choosing jury members. Your lawyer and the defendant’s lawyer will ask the potential jury members a number of questions in order to determine whether or not they should be on this jury. The lawyers and the judge can dismiss any potential jury members depending on how they answer the questions.

The biggest reason why you want to hire an Injury Attorney Tulsa to help with your case is so they can prepare a strong opening and closing statement. In some cases, all it takes to win is a good opening and closing statement. This is especially true of the closing statement as it is the very last chance your lawyer has to speak with the jury and try to persuade them in your favor. Hiring a lawyer that knows how to give both powerful and emotional speeches could end up being what wins your case. The other benefit to hiring a lawyer is the fact that they might be able to get the other party to settle so you do not actually have to go to court.

For more information, click here.

 

Save